Phenomenal Women Part 1

There is something incredible, remarkable, almost unbelievable that makes women extraordinary. From raising the slave masters children to running countries and Fortune 500 empires Black women have taken the intrinsic fiber of a woman and used it to mold themselves and their world into something exceptional. February is Black History Month. This February I am celebrating Black History Month by shining a light on a few of the amazing people who have contributed to the world we live in. Since everything starts with a woman these 7 Phenomenal Women are a good place to start.

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Patricia Bath (1942-Present) What She Invented: The Cataract Laserphaco Probe. Why It’s Important: Her device used an innovative method of removing cataract lenses with a laser, which was more accurate than the drill-like instruments that were in common use at the time. The New York ophthalmologist’s invention, patented in 1988, helped save the eyesight of millions and even restored sight to people who had been blind for more than 30 years. source: theroot.com

 

MARJORA CARTER

Carter received a MacArthur "genius grant" for creating green-collar job training and placement in urban areas. She also had the vision to see the Bronx River, near her blighted Hunts Point neighborhood in New York City, as a resource to revitalize her community and create green jobs. Her work was instrumental in the opening of Hunts Point Riverside Park in 2007, the area's first waterfront park in 60 years. Today The Root 100 honoree heads an eponymous consulting firm focused on urban revitalization and green-collar jobs.

Joshua Lutz/Institute

 HELEN GAYLE

After two decades working on HIV/AIDS at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Gayle used her knowledge to direct global health issues for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Today she chairs the Obama administration's Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS. Gayle, who is also the president and CEO of CARE USA, a humanitarian organization fighting poverty in more than 70 countries, ensures that women in the nation's poorest regions are provided with the resources needed to sustain their communities.

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GINA MCCAULEY

The tagline of the website McCauley founded -- What About Our Daughters -- says it all: "Unapologetic, Uncompromising, and Unbowed in Defense of Black Women and Girls." She began the blog in 2007 in response to Don Imus' infamous "nappy-headed hos" comment about a women's basketball team. The Root 100 honoree urges black women to stop supporting entities that portray them negatively. She is also the founder of Blogging While Brown, which is an annual gathering of black bloggers, and the Michelle Obama Watch blog.

Courtesy of The Guardian

MARIAN WRIGHT EDELMAN

The first black woman admitted to the Mississippi Bar in 1965, Edelman directed the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund in that state's capital city. In 1973 she founded theChildren's Defense Fund, which has become the premier children's-advocacy organization. The CDF issues reports and promotes public policy to ensure the well-being of the nation's youths. As part of her work with the CDF, Edelman is currently working on the Cradle to Prison Pipeline campaign to develop programs that will help prevent youths from entering the juvenile-justice system.

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There is no limit to what humanity can achieve if only we dare to dream and believe. Find the power to be someone exceptional. It's not about being exceptional to everyone, that may come in time, today start with being exceptional to someone in your own circle.

Until next time. Peace, Love, and Styles